Loaded Boards “Truncated Tesseract” Review

The Truncated Tesseract is the chopped version of the already rad Tesseract. Loaded cut it down to 33’’ integrating rocker; huge flared wheel-wells, W-concave, and multiple wheelbase options into a lightweight directional deck. It’s designed for hauling down mountain roads, high speeds, and quick slides. Here are Kyle Ramsey’s (from NoCoast Skate) thoughts on the beast.

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Kyle Ramsey / Truncated Tesseract / 180mm DeathREY / 45º REYvolver / 80mm Kegel / Single Malt photo

The Loaded Truncated Tesseract has been a blast to ride over the past couple of months. The deck has two wheelbase options: 24.5’’ & 26’’. I tried the the smallest option first and that made for an extremely responsive ride, but I found it made my stance for stand up slides narrow and uncomfortable. I quickly realized the 26″ option is where it’s at.
This deck is obviously made for speed, but it’s still tons of fun to freeride. With it’s chopped size, I find it most comfortable to put my back foot ¾ over the rear truck for heelsides. There is a sweet spot between the W and the huge wheel wells for toesides.

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Truncated drifts. Mac Merritt photo.

The Tesseract is made from two layers of custom fiberglass/epoxy skins sandwiched between two vertically-laminated bamboo cores to create a stiff yet light and damp structure. Laminated to the bottom of the board is a layer of cork which provides vibration damping and a significant level of durability. The granular, non-directional structure of the cork helps prevent abrasive damage from propagating (in contrast to a traditional wood or bamboo veneer with long, oriented fibers).

Dipping into the first apex. Single Malt photo.
Dipping into the first apex. Single Malt photo.

Even with the really wide W, the board feels simple and mellow under your feet. The width of the deck is 9.5’’ and with my size 10 shoe, that made for ample feet room. The ”W” has a nice slope that creates tons of pressure points for railing lines. This design allows the inside edges of your feet to push up against the W (for toeside slides) while also allowing the outside of your foot to rest in a more radial dish just behind the flared wheel wells (for comfort while tucking on long downhill runs).

Salty & wet pavement just make it more fun. Mac Merritt photo.
Salty & wet pavement just make it more fun. Mac Merritt photo.

 

Throwing dirty heelside drifts. Mac Merritt photo.
Throwing dirty heelside drifts. Mac Merritt photo.

With the huge flared wheel wells you can ride giant DH wheels like the new 80mm Kegels. I ride 180mm Death REY hangers, 45º REYvolver baseplates and .25” hard risers for extra clearance with loose trucks. I weigh about 160lbs and had no issues with wheel bite. The 3.5° wedging angle of the Truncated Tesseract allows for a wide range of interesting hardware configurations. A truck with a lower kingpin angle (below 45°) works best with the wedging angle to provide a versatile balance of lean and turn with a low ride height. A truck with a higher kingpin angle (above 45°) works best with a soft 3-4° wedged riser to preserve the steering geometry and damp vibrations. Whatever your setup, always test your board on before taking it down a run. Getting bucked at high speeds is never fun.         

Taking late day runs, Kyle Ramsey & Dylan Greenbaker. Blake Pesetsky photo.
Taking late day runs, Kyle Ramsey & Dylan Greenbaker. Blake Pesetsky photo.

Overall, this deck is super rad. It’s light, responsive, really durable and performed well at everything I threw at it. Loaded did a great job giving riders multiple options of the same deck. I have a feeling you’ll be seeing quite a few of these on the race scene this year.
Go check it out at http://www.loadedboards.com/boards/truncated-tesseract/

– Kyle Ramsey  

Behind the scenes with Single Malt. Single Malt photo.

Behind the scenes with Single Malt. Single Malt photo.

www.singlemalt.us
www.loadedboads.com
www.nocoast-skate.com
www.reytrucks.com

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